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Dental bridges: risks, complications, and benefits

Hi everyone!

I have skipped the first treatment option for tooth loss (implants), as it was covered in a previous blog you can find in “NEWS” section.

 Today I’m going to talk about dental bridges. It’s a very common treatment modality and it is basically consisted of doing crowns on the teeth adjacent to the empty space and a solid crown in the empty space, which is attached to the neighboring ones in a form of a “bridge”. (picture)

The process actually begins by getting the adjacent teeth prepared to receive the Crown and then taking either a digital scan or an impression to create a model and make the bridge on Top of the model, then fitting the bridge in patient’s mouth and gluing it on top of neighboring teeth.

 It’s a very good way to replace a missing tooth, because it doesn’t need surgical intervention, could be done relatively quickly, and it is solid, as it is glued to the neighboring teeth and patient doesn’t have to remove to clean.

 However, there is a vital point to be considered when diving into this form of treatments:

Oral hygiene around bridges is a concern. Due to the connection of the teeth, it is impossible to clean the spaces between them with a normal brush. Even in natural tooth scenario, we need to use dental floss, because there are some spaces where brush bristles cannot penetrate deep enough. In the case of a bridge, this problem is aggravated by the connection between the crowns. However, there are some specific ways to enter those constricted spaces: one is by using floss threaders and the second is by using interdental brushes or “Pixters” and it should be done daily. that’s very paramount, and if not done frequently and regularly, the bacteria which are lurking underneath those spaces will cause gum disease and more importantly, dental decay. So, this notion that the teeth underneath the bridge don’t need cleaning because they are covered with crowns is completely nonsense.

Doing proper hygiene measures is not a cumbersome task. It takes just a couple of minutes to clean those spaces and to make sure that the bridge would last for a long time.

 I hope this brief Explanation could have provided you with a general insight about dental bridges. In the next blog, I will cover the denture option.

Have a very good day!

Dental bridges: risks, complications, and benefits

Hi everyone!

I have skipped the first treatment option for tooth loss (implants), as it was covered in a previous blog you can find in “NEWS” section.

 Today I’m going to talk about dental bridges. It’s a very common treatment modality and it is basically consisted of doing crowns on the teeth adjacent to the empty space and a solid crown in the empty space, which is attached to the neighboring ones in a form of a “bridge”. (picture)

The process actually begins by getting the adjacent teeth prepared to receive the Crown and then taking either a digital scan or an impression to create a model and make the bridge on Top of the model, then fitting the bridge in patient’s mouth and gluing it on top of neighboring teeth.

 It’s a very good way to replace a missing tooth, because it doesn’t need surgical intervention, could be done relatively quickly, and it is solid, as it is glued to the neighboring teeth and patient doesn’t have to remove to clean.

 However, there is a vital point to be considered when diving into this form of treatments:

Oral hygiene around bridges is a concern. Due to the connection of the teeth, it is impossible to clean the spaces between them with a normal brush. Even in natural tooth scenario, we need to use dental floss, because there are some spaces where brush bristles cannot penetrate deep enough. In the case of a bridge, this problem is aggravated by the connection between the crowns. However, there are some specific ways to enter those constricted spaces: one is by using floss threaders and the second is by using interdental brushes or “Pixters” and it should be done daily. that’s very paramount, and if not done frequently and regularly, the bacteria which are lurking underneath those spaces will cause gum disease and more importantly, dental decay. So, this notion that the teeth underneath the bridge don’t need cleaning because they are covered with crowns is completely nonsense.

Doing proper hygiene measures is not a cumbersome task. It takes just a couple of minutes to clean those spaces and to make sure that the bridge would last for a long time.

 I hope this brief Explanation could have provided you with a general insight about dental bridges. In the next blog, I will cover the denture option.

Have a very good day!

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